Top
Image Alt
  /    /  Education  /  Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You – Discussion Questions, Close Reading, Reflection FREE PDF Download

Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You – Discussion Questions, Close Reading, Reflection FREE PDF Download

 

 

 

  • File type: ZIP
  • Size of file: 17.9 MB

Please be sure that you have the application necessary to open the file type.

Description

The teaching resources for Ibram X. Kendi and Jason Reynold’s Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You will help students comprehend and process this essential reading. Since our history is shared, it is our responsibility to understand its varied personal and communal impact in order to strive for an antiracist future. The resources will give students repeated opportunities to synthesize this idea and repeated opportunities to make connections across the historical events discussed in the text, modern events, and their own lives. With numerous options for implementation, the unit also allows for differentiation and can enable accommodation that will meet the needs of all learners. Fundamentally, the reading response resources, close reading resources, reflection resources, and read aloud resources, provide a core set of materials to engage in a thoughtful, meaningful, and impactful read aloud of the text.

 

In addition, the book unit is FREE. Why? No matter a reader’s background, Stamped was written to purposefully change worldviews, and reading such a book is a rare opportunity. These materials are meant to help guide and encourage reflection. After all, each student will process its content differently, and the big questions it poses are the point of reading it. What are students taking away from the book? How, if at all, is their thinking changing? They are weighty ideas but it is essential for our young people to consider them. The task is not easy, but the resources are intended to help make it feel possible. They are intended to draw out students’ thinking in a way that enables a transformative experience in the classroom that alters their worldview. Ultimately, it will take all of us – adults, young people, students, teachers, and parents – working together to realize the change. LIT Lessons wants to do their part and take a small step in that direction by encouraging thoughtful engagement with the text. With that step, it hopes to take a small hack at helping rip out the roots of racism in America.

Description

The teaching resources for Ibram X. Kendi and Jason Reynold’s Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You will help students comprehend and process this essential reading. Since our history is shared, it is our responsibility to understand its varied personal and communal impact in order to strive for an antiracist future. The resources will give students repeated opportunities to synthesize this idea and repeated opportunities to make connections across the historical events discussed in the text, modern events, and their own lives. With numerous options for implementation, the unit also allows for differentiation and can enable accommodation that will meet the needs of all learners. Fundamentally, the reading response resources, close reading resources, reflection resources, and read aloud resources, provide a core set of materials to engage in a thoughtful, meaningful, and impactful read aloud of the text.

In addition, the book unit is FREE. Why? No matter a reader’s background, Stamped was written to purposefully change worldviews, and reading such a book is a rare opportunity. These materials are meant to help guide and encourage reflection. After all, each student will process its content differently, and the big questions it poses are the point of reading it. What are students taking away from the book? How, if at all, is their thinking changing? They are weighty ideas but it is essential for our young people to consider them. The task is not easy, but the resources are intended to help make it feel possible. They are intended to draw out students’ thinking in a way that enables a transformative experience in the classroom that alters their worldview. Ultimately, it will take all of us – adults, young people, students, teachers, and parents – working together to realize the change. LIT Lessons wants to do their part and take a small step in that direction by encouraging thoughtful engagement with the text. With that step, it hopes to take a small hack at helping rip out the roots of racism in America.